Exercise Your Way Into New Brain Cells To Gain Memory

Anyone that has ever lost their keys, forgot what they were supposed to get at the grocery store or arrived at the wrong time for a doctor appointment knows that memory can be tricky. You may always be able to recite all 50 American states, what year your children or siblings were born and what you had for dinner last night, but can you remember how many cars you passed on your drive home? Or how many emails you've read in the past week? In this article, we'll give you a few strategies to improve your memory and help you do just that.

Pay careful attention to what you want to remember to ensure the information is retained in your long-term memory. Distractions, such as music and television, prevent you from paying the required amount of attention to the material. Failure to concentrate will result in the information being lost and not committed to memory.

It is easier to remember information if you organize the material into related groups, before trying to commit it to memory. Making an outline is another good way to organize the material to be studied. This is similar to how your brain organizes information and will make recall simpler.

If you're a student trying to boost your memory for a test, the worst thing you can do is cram. Attempting to learn so much in too little time will not allow you to retain anything at all. You will only grasp bits of pieces of the material and will not be able to properly learn what you need to.

Do your best to use multiple locations when studying, this way your brain will file the information into long term storage, rather than just associating it with a specific location. This works because you will associate the information you are learning with the location you learned it in. That means studying in different places to help it go into long-term memory.

When trying to memorize new information, take the time and effort to think about how this unfamiliar material relates to something that you already know and understand. By finding a relationship between new concepts and previously learned material, you will increase the likelihood of committing the new information to memory.

Get books on memory from a library to learn about this complex mechanism. There are a number of excellent books written by leading psychologists on topics relating to the brain and memory functions. You will find many useful tidbits of knowledge in these books that can help you in your quest for an improved memory.

If you are trying to remember a large list of items, try placing them in categories. For instance, if you are headed to the grocery store and have a number of items that you want to get while are there, mentally group them into categories such as meat, dairy, produce and grains. Breaking down big lists into smaller subcategories makes them far easier to remember.

If you are finding your memory is lacking it may be because of a lack of sleep. As such try getting more rest. Scientists believe that when we are asleep it is when our brain sorts through the events of our lives and files them away, like a librarian and a filing cabinet. They also believe this is why we dream.

It is crucial that you eat breakfast if you are trying to improve your memory. Many doctors and health professionals have found that eating breakfast fuels the mind after not having eaten for many hours because of sleep. Even if it is a bowl of fruit, be sure to never skip breakfast.

Eat foods that help your brain perform better. Eat plenty of healthy fats to encourage healthy brain functioning. These good fats are found in things like fish, certain nuts, as well as olive oil and flax seed oil.

If you are having problems concentrating or memorizing things, try getting more sleep. Your brain needs at least six to eight hours of sleep a night to function properly. If you have a sleep deficit, it can show in your cognitive abilities. If you're having problems getting enough sleep, don't ignore this; consult your physician. Very few people can manage to stay healthy in the longterm with only a few hours sleep per night, so don't be fooled by the claims of those who insist that they can get by on 5 hours per night.

Do not feel ashamed to talk to yourself if you have a bad memory and you are trying to remember something important. Sometimes, all it takes is talking out loud for you to remember where you have placed a certain lost item or remembering what you have to do.

If you need help retaining a difficult concept or remembering the massive amount of information you studied the night before that big college exam, get up and get moving. The brain, like other parts of our body, requires energy to work, and it gets that energy from oxygen and other nutrients carried through the bloodstream. Click Here Spending long, unbroken hours in a chair, pouring over books or staring at a computer screen, causes the blood to congeal and deprives the brain of that needed energy. So get up and go for a brisk walk or a swim, anything to get the blood pumping and moving through your body. It's a proven fact that the more physically active you are, the smarter you will be too.

Try to remain calm. Not being able to remember something can stress you out and cause you to become anxious. Take a few deep breaths and, calmly, try to access your memories. Anxiety and panic make it far more difficult for you to remember specific things. It is more efficient to keep your cool.

Thousands of people swear by mnemonic devices as a means of improving memory. This strategy involves pairing something that you know well with something you need to remember. Mnemonic devices often involve rhymes, songs or jokes. They are a fun way to improve your memory, and they often take the frustration out of studying.

Close your eyes. Your brain spends a lot of energy on processing what you are seeing. If you have difficulty remembering something, try closing your eyes. Your brain will have an easier time finding the information. It will also make it easier for you to picture said information in your head.

Try learning a new language. Learning a new language can really help to keep your mind and memory in shape. It has also been proven to delay brain deterioration and dementia. Just immersing yourself in the language will do. There is no need to become a fluent speaker of it.

Memory loss does not have to be inevitable. Try the ideas from this article. You may find that you have the tools to keep your memory active and strong for years to come.

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